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The Keylog Archives

Keylog Spring 2021

The Sunday Issue

"Sunday clears away the rust of the rest of the week," - Joseph Addison

(Be seated and read)

I Love Sundays

Sundays are special at Camp Nebagamon. It’s surely obvious to all of you who spent summers at camp—a bit like saying that DQ blizzards are refreshing. But I’ll say it again: Sundays are special. In fact, I’d argue that the whole day is refreshing.

It starts with a late wake-up, which is always nice (unless you happen to be a Swamper counselor), followed by a breakfast of cinnamon rolls or coffee cake. No complaints about that. Ever. So the camp family actually starts the day refreshed.

Then the Sunday Service, which is always a wonder to me on several levels. First, the camp family arrives in silence. I always find it remarkable that the same campers who turn the Rec Hall into a cacophony of sound can muster up the restraint to arrive quietly at the Chuck Hirsch Shrine and remain respectfully silent for the duration. Refreshing.

The Sunday choir is always a revelation, too. Over the years, it has transformed only slightly. What was a piano back in the day may now be a guitar accompaniment, or a bongo, or maybe even a saxophone. And there are at least as many campers as counselors in the choir (this may have something to do with escaping cabin cleanup duties). And the songs aren’t always traditional (Cynthia Rolfe opted for “Monster Mash” a couple of summers ago). But always, it’s comforting to hear a subsection of the camp family singing beneath the whispering pines. And always, the songs are relevant to the subject matter.

1994

That subject is chosen by the speaker, of course. And as you’ll see in the “SUNDAY MORNING” piece in this newsletter, there is no shortage of topics. But we choose the speaker, and it’s a deliberate choice. When Stephanie introduces the person and highlights their background, I am constantly reminded about how impressive our staff’s accomplishments are—both within camp and beyond it.

Then, of course, once they start speaking, I’m reminded further. Surely, alumni recall their favorite Sunday Services. I’m certain the current campers and counselors will, too. Two summers ago, when associate director Adam Fornear talked about how “There is always a way,” the notion of finding a means of solving problems via advice and imagination undoubtedly resonated with campers who might be eyeing a big trip or trying to make the archery team or navigating relationships with cabinmates. And when Jaye Hensel discussed her lifelong experiences with a physical disability, there was certainly nobody sitting under those pines who wasn’t profoundly moved. In this day and age, when it seems like civil discourse and an appreciation of wisdom can be in short supply, respectful listening is, yes, refreshing.

Larry Cartwright, 1974

Another Sunday tradition: watermelon. Always refreshing, too. And quite the tradition, as you’ll see in the photos in the “SUNDAY AFTERNOON” section of this Keylog.

1988

And then, of course, the Sunday evening activity (see “SUNDAY EVENING”)—a Council Fire. I suspect there aren’t too many alumni who didn’t participate in one way or another—either as a writer, a speaker, or a cast member. I’ve always contended that the Council Fire is the best part of each week. Through skits and monologues, humor and profundity, we get a full understanding of camp’s connections, camp’s challenges and successes and lessons, camp’s summer-specific inside jokes, camp’s magic. From the beginning (“Our camp family is now assembled”) to the end (“All Night, All Day”), Council Fires are the heart and soul of camp.

Take initiative. Challenge yourself. Support a friend. Make good choices. Have a good attitude. Be your best you. Whatever the topic, it is always another reminder—of the creativity of our staff and the amazing ways in which they are able to mix a dollop of silliness with a heavy dose of perceptiveness.

1963

They do it all in front of a comfortable crackling fire that fades as darkness descends. And then it is time to, yes, refresh that fire. The Keylog Ceremony may be my favorite moment of my favorite part of my favorite day at camp. It offers several things:

Opportunity: A camper or staff member can offer a very public thank you or homage, whether it’s toward a counselor who helped them overcome homesickness, or a friend who helped through a challenge in the Boundary Waters, or a family member struggling at home. More than a few campers simply find the words to thank Nebagamon itself.

Inspiration: I find it inspiring that anyone, whether age 8 or 68, can find the courage to stand in front of a few hundred people and emote. I suspect it stems from gratitude and a certain self-realization. But I always find it life-affirming.

Finally, a physical metaphor: All of that gratitude, that emotion, slowly but surely rebuilds the fire into a raging flame. It punctuates the Sunday with an exclamation point—just before we head back to our cabins, we warm ourselves by a fire generated completely by the kindness and consideration of the members of our family. And after all, we all aim to Keep the Fires Burning.

I love Sundays.  

2016

Sunday Morning

When Nardie and Sally Stein retired from camp and cleaned out their files, Sally purged the file containing all of her Sunday Services—a move she regrets. So her recollections about the sermons she imparted through thirty years of mornings at the Chuck Hirsch Shrine are understandably general. “Hmm, what subjects did I talk about all those years?  I know I discussed evaluating change and how to adjust to it, using all of your senses (I passed around examples of taste and smell, also played part of a beautiful violin concerto), being alert to the world around you, living an optimistic life. And I often sent a message to empower social action,” she says. “I am in my late eighties now, and perhaps after all those Sunday sermons, the numbers might be with me. Hopefully among the hundreds of campers and staff who heard my talks, there are those who remember other messages I hoped to send into their lives. ”The same goes for all of the camp directors who gave myriad Sunday talks through the years. Of course, for most Camp Nebagamon staff members, the opportunity to give even one Sunday Service is a seminal experience. Jon Colman, for instance, still owns the notes from his 1976 service. So we wondered: With an old photo to spark a memory, how well do camp alumni recall the messages they sent out on a singular Sunday morning.

Jon Colman (1976): My speech stressed the importance of being your own person and making up your own mind and not giving in to outside pressures. And if you do your own soul searching and make a decision that is best for you, this will lead to a better and fulfilled life and path for you.

Charles Hirschhorn (1977): Who ever forgets their Sunday Service? My topic was “common sense.” Since I led bicycling trips on the trip staff that summer, I discussed assembling a bicycle as a metaphor for putting together the elements in assembling practical, usable common sense. At the end, I asked for a volunteer to ride the bike. I chose a front-row Swamper, but unfortunately I forgot to lower the seat, which had been installed very high. My ending did not reinforce my topic! Much more recently (2013), my talk was: What I Learned Playing 4-square. From having fun to serving others, lots of great life lessons are found on the 4-square court.

Hank Pulitzer (2016): That one was about “finding your inner camp person.” The idea, more or less, was that a “camp person” is someone who see what needs to get done and just does it without being asked. It’s someone who goes the extra mile and does the job no one wants—and with a smile on their face. I spoke about people in my camp life who helped me find my inner camp person and gave specific examples of things they did that left a mark on me. Then, in closing, I encouraged everyone to look around and find someone who was helping them to discover their inner camp person and then to go one step further and take that camp person into the rest of the world outside of camp.

Josh Davis (1983): OMG! When was I that young? I spoke about Martin Luther King, Jr.—and about standing up for what you believe in. I quoted from his speeches and tried to explain what real courage is. I made a terrible attempt to connect MLK to To Kill A Mockingbird. I remember boring the whole camp.

Jason Hirschhorn (2018): I gave this service on the topic of gratitude. Since I was (and still am) a high school teacher, I decided to assign some homework to the camp family at the service’s end. Here’s what I told everyone: “It’s 11 a.m. now, and we sing ‘Taps’ at 9:30 p.m., which means you have ten and a half hours left in the day. Take a small fraction of that time to think about someone at camp who’s done something for you and who often doesn’t get as much gratitude from you as they probably should. Make sure you know their name. Ask it if you don’t know it. And then go up to them, say hello, and tell them why you’re thankful for who they are and what they do.” I think it’s a good assignment for all of us to keep working on!

Bob Chukerman (1977): Thanks for taking me back in time. Not many pictures available with the beardless Bob. I do remember that day, nerves and all and I believe my service was about Communication. Those days had me working in the Axeman Village with a bunch of young teenagers, trying to build a strong cohesive group and thinking how important it was for them to learn to get along. Better communication and the ability to learn to express oneself seemed like a great place to start. One highlight of my talk that I remember is my discussion of the Jops. Back then, there were few dividers and no doors, so going to the Jop was a VERY social event. A lot of communication was done sitting around with your friends and also maybe somebody you really didn’t know so well. My guess is that it might have helped us all to learn that we are all more alike than we ever really thought. Well times have changed. Progress has been made, but who knows if the old ways wouldn’t be better for us and the art of communication.

Adam Fornear (2006): I decided to speak about wilderness…What is wilderness to you? For some, it’s being camped out in a 40-foot RV in Yellowstone National Park/ For others, it is backcountry paddling in Quetico Provincial Park. Were not here to judge, but what is important is that we all have a little bit of wilderness in our lives. And as an added bonus, the Nebaga-choir brought it all home at the end by singing “Dixieland Delight” by Alabama. Love those Sunday mornings at camp.

Raven Deerwater (1979): First of all, I had the camp choir sing “Ain’t no Stopping Us Now,” the first use of a disco song at a Nebagamon Sunday Service. Second of all, the unseen chart to my left contained a list of eight words that served both as an outline of the service and steps to think about as you approached your problems and situations. I don’t remember all eight words, but, in general, it was about making plans, carrying them out, and then evaluating to see if your plans worked and how they could be applied or modified in future endeavors. So I would say that overall it was a plan to create and carry out plans!

Jacob Blumenfeld (2013): The Sunday Service I presented was titled “The Importance of Being Earnest,” and it was about sincerity. I quoted a line from a “Calvin and Hobbes” book that I first read as a camper on the back porch of the Waldorf. My theory was (and is) that sincerity is the secret ingredient that makes everything at camp so great: men, women, and boys who 100% buy in to everything they do. The opening music was a Bach cello suite performed by my brother Sam. That quiet morning, surrounded by friends and family, listening to notes written over 280 years ago float through the pine trees was—sincerely—one of the most transcendent experiences of my life.

Hugh Broder (1975): While I no longer have the copy of my Sunday Service, I remember the subject. It’s hard to see in the photo, but hanging over my left shoulder is the painting of Muggs from the Big House living room in which he is sitting on a log, smoking his pipe, and there are thought bubbles or maybe puffs of smoke, sort of, representing what he is thinking.  I can’t remember what’s in the specific bubbles/puffs, but my service was inspired by that painting, and it had to do with dreaming and making dreams come true.

Roger Wallenstein (1997): Sunday services always gave me an opportunity to communicate thoughts I had during the year. I often made a few notes to jog my memory as the first Sunday of the camping season approached. As a former camper, I had memories of the staff who truly made a positive impression on me. So one Sunday I fetched some photos from the archives to talk about these people and how I was impacted by their words and actions. Of course, one objective focused on raising awareness by the staff that they could be one of those individuals whose memory and influence would be felt years later. And I wanted our campers to realize that these folks were right there in their midst. All they had to do was be open to them. Those were wonderful Sundays.

Sunday Evening

The Council Fire has been a Camp Nebagamon custom since the earliest days of the institution. For decades and decades, it has begun with “Our camp family has now assembled.” And it has concluded with that camp family singing around a fire fed by keylogs. So sitting around that blazing fire feels a bit like claiming a spot in history. Heck, Herb Hollinger once conducted a Council Fire… about lumberjacks.

But most traditions survive with some welcome tweaks over the years. There are, in fact, some elements of a Sunday Council Fire that have evolved or changed over time. For instance:

THE TOTEM POLE

The totem pole has stood guard over the Council Fire Ring since 1936, as evidenced by the date carved into it. In the summer of 1961, it was repainted—by Lumberjack 4 and counselor Chuck Long. But by 2017, after 81 years, it was rotting considerably. So in the winter of 2017-18, the totem pole was rebuilt entirely by longtime head caretaker Andy Mack, who remained as faithful to the original as possible. Only the date is different.

THE RING

Take a look at the two photos below—from 1939 and 1949. You’ll notice two things in particular. First, the totem pole towers over the saplings that surround the area. That scene has certainly changed. Second, it was—quite literally—a Council Fire Ring. Benches all the way around. By the 1960s, the current seating configurement was in place. But in the early days, watching a Council Fire was a bit like attending a theater-in-the-round. In fact, Sally Stein remembers why: It was a horseback riding ring.

THE ENTRANCE

The act of entering the Council Fire Ring—village by village, completely silent—is a long Nebagamon tradition (the photo below is from 1962). And it’s a special one. But we’ve found a couple of references to other kinds of entrances that were… unexpected. In 1995, staff member Axel Berger made an entrance into the Paul Bunyan Day Council Fire that saw him fly from a tree with the help of an almost-invisible guide wire. And then there is this excerpt from Keeping the Fires Burning by Nardie and Sally Stein: “In early years sometimes a flaming torch or an arrow was fastened to a string reaching from the Upper Diamond to the center of the Council Fire. It slid down the string, lighting the fire, which gave a dramatic, if slightly dangerous, opening to the evening’s program.”

THE KEYLOG BOX

Keylogs to conclude Council Fires have been around forever—organic thank-you notes that become symbols of a community keeping the fires burning. But alumni who haven’t set foot in the Council Fire Ring in four decades might not be familiar with the Keylog Box where campers and staff can pick up one of those logs as they approach the Council Fire Ring.

Specifically, it’s the Matt Cohen Memorial Keylog Box. In Keeping the Fires Burning, the Steins described its creation this way: “Matt Cohen, a camper in 1979 and 1980, was the son of former camper and staff member Mike Cohen and Kathy Byrne. Matt had an incurable heart condition. His parents knew his days were numbered, but wanted to pack what time he had left with joyful experiences. And so he came to camp for two summers. Between his second and what would have been his third summer, Matt died suddenly while playing soccer. The Keylog Box is how camp has memorialized him.”

There are larger memorials. There are more widely-known memorials. But a Keylog represents heartfelt gratitude to people who made a difference in someone’s life. And the Council Fire Ring is a sacred place that keeps memories alive over generations. So there may not be a more appropriate memorial.

So a Council Fire blends decades of tradition with attempts at profundity and performance innovation. Here, several alumni recall memories from their own Council Fires:

Ron Koretz (1984): I co-wrote a Council Fire with Adam Kaplan. Yes, that Adam Kaplan. The theme of our Council Fire was victimization,” he recalled. “This was a meaningful topic for us because it symbolized that we had grown up and no longer accepted that ‘boys will be boys.’ The final scene featured the bully going to a job interview with the CEO of a now large and successful company. The CEO was, you guessed it, the guy who had been bullied as a kid. Suffice it to say the bully did not get the job!”

Michael Weinberg (1971): “My” Council Fire, on July 10, 1971, was really “our” Council Fire, as it was jointly written by several senior counselors, including me. The theme of our collaborative effort was Friendship. We opened with a recording of Carole King singing “You’ve Got a Friend”, after which, to get things going, I read a poem about friendship by A.P. Stanley. Friendship is such an integral part of the camp experience, and so emphasized throughout the season, that we had to work hard to avoid letting our message get hackneyed or cliched (and I hope we succeeded!). Highlights were a story told by Darryl Couts about a friendship between a camper and counselor that lapsed, until they were unexpectedly reunited during a frightening wartime flight; a reading by Ed Lewin of a letter from a son to his deceased dad about the son’s missed opportunities for friendship with his father when he was alive; and Ken Kanter’s recital of how the friendship of a counselor for a boy who was physically weak and introverted, and bullied by other campers, had brought the boy happiness in what was to be his last summer before dying of leukemia. Other participants in the Council Fire included Steve Lewin, Mike Stern, Dave Gibbs, Randy Hearsh and David Lapin.  We closed with — what else? — “We Shall Keep The Friends We Found Here.”

Walt Fromm (2017): I wrote a council fire about passionately trying new things. It was really important to me at the time because I was about to depart on a nine-month study abroad program that moved throughout Asia with a group of people that I didn’t know all that well. Jumping into new things is a skill I learned at camp as a boy and is the reason I was able to study abroad in Asia on what would be the most amazing educational experience of my life. My camp experience definitely helped out when I was sharing a room with six people in 90-degree Mumbai and our air conditioner broke for four days.

Irl Scissors (1993): Adam Winick and I wrote a Council Fire about friendship. Camp is full of opportunities to challenge yourself honing skills in everything from tennis to canoeing, but one of its greatest assets is the friendships you make when you are there. Our skits relayed that friendships came in all shapes, sizes, ages and they last beyond camp, onto college, marriage, and eventually new generations.

Louis Levin (2014): In 2014 I was provided the opportunity to present a Council Fire for camp, and I presented on “Go Mode”, or, how to change your mindset to accomplish goals. Being 18 and a bit of a contrarian, I tried to break the mold of scripted Council fires and opted for more of a workshop on mindset change. I had campers pair up and talk to one another about highlights from their summer, and then share back observations of the physical changes in their posture, face, hands, when they discussed successes. It was incredibly fun having 200 campers telling each other stories about their best camp moments all around the Council Fire Ring to access their own Go Mode!

Of course, Council Fires are most inspirational when they affect others. So we asked Joey Laskin to recall a powerful one from his camp years:

The Council Fire that was the most memorable to me was written by Phil Yenawine. The theme was art, which at face value is a unique topic that was out of the box from what you typically see on Sunday evenings. What made it memorable was how he involved so many kids, who mostly were younger and were not your typical Council Fire “actors.” These kids all frequented the art shack, where Phil was a staple, and they were not the most outgoing and extroverted kids at camp. To see them have an opportunity to shine in front of the camp family and show off what they are passionate about… it was so inspiring. Much like art is enhanced by collaboration, this Council Fire was enhanced by a collaborative approach with a diverse and wide ranging set of “actors.”

Camp Family News

Keep us posted! You can send life updates to Louis Levin in the Camp Nebagamon office (louis@campnebagamon.com) or directly to Keylog editor Brad Herzog (brad@bradherzog.com).

Paul Chutkow (Highland Park, IL/Napa, CA 58-62, 64-66) is the president of Val de Grace Books, a small publishing house that he founded in 2005. A former foreign correspondent for the Associated Press and regular contributor to The New York Times, he has authored several books. His light-hearted memoir Zelda, the Queen of Paris received a Benjamin Franklin Award in 2018… Scott Silberstein (77, 79 Evanston, IL) was honored in January as the first recipient of the Chicago Dance History Project’s Maurice Seymour Award for Vision and Service. Scott is the producer and co-founder (with Matt Hoffman) of HMS Media, an Emmy Award-winning multimedia company that creates broadcast, online, and mobile content for theatre and dance companies in Chicago and nationally…

1975

Dan Feldman (St. Louis, Bethesda, MD 80-81, 83-85) has joined the Biden Administration as Chief of Staff and Counselor to John Kerry, who has been tapped as the Special Presidential Envoy for Climate… Jen Daskal (Washington D.C. 91-92, 96, 99) has been named Deputy General Counsel (Cyber and Technology) at the Department of Homeland Security… Jeff Rosenberg (Shaker Heights, OH/Los Angeles 92-97, 99) is a filmmaker who has worked on television shows such as Veep, The Good Place, and The League. He has written and directed a feature film called We Broke Up, just released on demand. It’s about a couple breaking up right before her sister’s wedding and pretending to still be together to not ruin the fun. The wedding takes place at her old summer camp, and there is an extended sequence of games lovingly referred to as… Paul Bunyan Day! Check out the trailer here.

2016

Michael Kaplan (Evanston/Los Angeles 01-05, 07-08) is an investigative producer for CBS News… Evan Dorfman (Chicago/Brooklyn 99-04) and Ben Cronin (Chicago/Brooklyn 04, 06-12) of the band Gilligan Moss released a new single, Slow Down, and a debut album. You can watch the music video hereCharles Meyer (New York City 06-11, 12) has also released new songs on streaming platforms. You can listen to “Love” and “Strongman” hereChelsea Tom (Hawaii/Los Angeles 13) is a pediatric oncology nurse at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital.

1953

Our productive alumni:

Jeff Schram (Boston/Lutz Florida 97-02, 04-06) and Natalie Mandel – Weston

Jessa DeGroote (Austin, TX/New Jersey 10) and Joshua Bernstein – Mara

Ryan Glasspiegel (Simsbury, CT/Chicago 96-02, 04-07, 09) and Karla Bright – Effie

Danny Cohen (Washington, D.C./Los Angeles 95-01, 03-07, 10-11) and Emily Towers – Margaret

___________

We are sad to report the following deaths:

Chuck Cohen (St. Louis 34-37, 39, 42)

Michael Cohen (St. Louis/Duluth, MN 46-54, 56)

Henry “Bunky” Harris (Cincinnati 48-55)

David Rosenblatt (Hopkins, MN 51-57)

Ted Koplar (St. Louis 53-57)

Victor Cohen (St. Louis 67-68)

Thanks for the Pines Book

Want an inspiring way to experience CN year-round? Leave it on your coffee table. There are still copies of THANKS FOR THE PINES: A Celebration of Camp Nebagamon available here. Hundreds of photos, dozens of essays, countless memories. Open it any time you’re feeling wistful.

Footsteps

As these campers roam the 77 acres of Camp Nebagamon this summer, they’ll be following in ancestral footsteps:

Sebastian & Jude Alderman (Tulsa) – father Jeff Alderman

Zander Aronoff (Englewood, CO) – father Joel Aronoff

Alexander Averbuch (Atlanta) – father Greg Averbuch

Ace & Addison Burvall (San Diego) – mother Amber Burvall

Darren & Zach Bell (Denver) – grandfather Fred Joseph

Daniel Brick (Kansas City) – father David Brick

Aaron & Max Brine (Boulder, CO) – grandfather Jon Colman

Judah Callen (Kensington, CA) – father David Callen

Jack Chait (East Hampton, NY) – father Daniel Chait

Asher Corndorf (Minneapolis) – father Eric Corndorf

Josh Desenberg (Arlington, VA) – father Jon Desenberg

Adam Eberhard (Chicago) – father Jeff Eberhard

Evan Friedman (Chicago) – grandfather Bud Friedman

Emmitt Gerstein (Washington, D.C.) – father Jim Gerstein

Mark Gingiss (Buffalo Grove, IL) — Father Dan Gingiss

Max & Will Goldfarb (Bellaire, TX) – father David Goldfarb

Matthew Gordon (Deerfield, IL) – father Andrew Gordon

Charlie Goshko (Washington, D.C.) – father Matt Goshko

Will Gray (Deerfield, IL) – father Josh Gray, grandfather Jim Gray

Benjamin Green (Northbrook, IL) – father Howard Green

Jacob Greenwald (Atlanta) – father Keith Greenwald

Ari Held (Silver Spring, MD) – father Larry Held

Gabriel Heller (New York City) – father John Heller

Eli Hoffman (Lexington, KY) – father Mark Hoffman

Adam Kaufman (Anchorage, AK) – father Bob Kaufman

Simon Kessler (Washington, D.C.) – father Eric Kessler

Stanley & Stafford Klein (Northbrook, IL) – father Spencer Klein

Chase Kornblet (Glenview, IL) – father Ben Kornblet

Max Kotin (Chicago) – father Josh Kotin

Benjamin & Jacob Laytin (Chicago) – father Dan Laytin, grandfather Bill Laytin

David Levick (Chicago) – father Michael Levick

Edge Levine (New Orleans) – grandfather Arthur Pulitzer

Benjamin Mack (Washington, D.C.) – father Andy Mack, grandfather Alan Mack

Ryan Mack (Bedford Hills, NY) – father Ken Mack, grandfather Alan Mack

Avi Maidenberg (Oakland, CA) – father Daniel Maidenberg, grandfather Mike Maidenberg

Ezra Maidenberg (Oakland, CA) – father Joe Maidenberg, grandfather Mike Maidenberg

Josh Marcus (Chicago) – mother Jill Kiersky Marcus, grandfather Jim Kiersky

Holden May (Germantown, TN) – father Jonathan May

Sam Montag (Atlanta) – father John Montag

Will Needlman (Evanston, IL) – father Randy Needlman

Bokai Portis (Evanston, IL) – father Charlie Portis

Zach Riven (Dallas) – father Jay Riven, grandfather Steve Riven

Jacob Rolfe (Highland Park, IL) – father Jim Rolfe, grandfather Mike Rolfe

Graham Rontal (Portland, OR) – father Andrew Rontal

Jonah Rontal (Huntington Woods, MI) – father Matt Rontal

Myles Rontal (Birmingham, MI) – father Dan Rontal

Sebastian Rorsted (Pöcking, Germany) – father Kasper Rorsted, grandfather Bendt Rorsted

Micah Rosenbloom (Nashville) – father Trent Rosenbloom

Sidney & Lazer Rosenbloom (Brooklyn, NY) — father Brice Rosenbloom

Zachary & Kai Ruwitch (Shanghai, China) – father John Ruwitch, grandfather Joe Ruwitch

Danny Schottenstein (Tiburon, CA) – father Jeff Schottenstein

Griffin & Dylan Scissors (St. Louis) – father Irl Scissors

William Schwarz (Woodbury, MN) – father Edward Schwarz, grandfather Roy Schwarz

Logan Segal (Edina, MN) – father Mark Segal

Brett Sholiton (San Antonio, TX) – father Mike Sholiton

Matan and Sagiv Siegel (Stamford, CT) – father Michael Siegel

Benji & Jacob Solomon (New York City) – father Josh Solomon

Nathan & Seth Starhill (Arlington, MA) – father Jon Star, grandfather Frank Star

Eli Terman (Chicago) – grandfather Tom Philipsborn

Asher & Tanner Toback (Chicago) – mother Keri Rosenbloom

Jonah Tone – (Cabin John, MD) – grandfather Joel Salon Jr., great grandfather Joel Salon Sr.

Jake Wallenstein (Issaquah, WA) – father Chet Wallenstein, grandparents Roger & Judy Wallenstein

Murray Wieseneck (Iowa City, IA) – father David Wieseneck

Dax Winegarden (Ann Arbor, MI) – father Jay Winegarden, mother Lisa Markman

Charlie Zeeck (Oklahoma City) – father Andy Zeeck

Thank You, Donors

The Camp Nebagamon Charities website www.cncharities.org is dedicated to both the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund (CNSF) and Camperships For Nebagamon (CFN). Learn about different donation options, read about each charity, and more.

New Level of Alumni Support for Nebagamon-Affiliated Charities

Nebagamon’s alumni community has stepped up support for our affiliated charities in recent years in meaningful ways. In addition to generous direct support for both Camperships for Nebagamon and the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund, alumni have increasingly encouraged donations to one or both funds as memorials and to honor happy occasions. Camp Nebagamon Charities also instituted a virtual keylog program, a means of giving while thanking someone special (you can donate and fill out a message here). Contributions are split evenly between Nebagamon’s two affiliated charities. You will receive two separate emails confirming your contribution to each fund. If you’d like to give a unique donation to CFN or CNSF of if you’d like to give a gift in honor or memory of someone, please use the CFN-specific and CNSF-specific donation pages.

Recent Donors to the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund

Recent generous donations to the Camp Nebagamon Scholarship Fund (CNSF) helped 224 kids attend non-profit camps in the summer of 2019. CNSF helps children and teens who experience poverty and disability attend non-profit summer camps that specialize in meeting their needs. Recipient camps (located near communities where Nebagamon campers live) offer expert therapeutic and adaptive recreation and a nurturing environment for kids who have been exposed to adversity and trauma. Children are among peers and role models for success at these camps as they enjoy friendship, adventure and personal growth — opening new possibilities for a more positive future.

CNSF was founded in 1947 by Muggs and Janet Lorber, Nebagamon’s founding directors, and administered for 50+ years by Nebagamon’s former directors, Nardie and Sally Lorber Stein. Check out our Instagram and Facebook page to learn more!

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The following individuals, foundations, and corporations supported CNSF from November 1, 2020, through April 30, 2021:

Steve Addison
Chuck and Ruth Adler
Jeffrey and Kelly Alderman
Amazon Smile Foundation
Anonymous
Pam and Tom Arenberg
Susan Arenberg
Art and Marian Auer
Deb and Joe Badt
Andrew and Elizabeth Baer
Nancy and Richard Baer
Dmitry Balyasny
Kathy and Stuart Barnett
Bob and Linda Barrows
Charlie Barrows
Jim and June Baumoel
Allen Bennett
Babs and Bob Benton
Big Lots! (Matching Gift)
The Peter Bloch Family
Lisa and Paul Blumberg
Jim Blumenfeld and Chris Cooney
Ronald Borod
Elizabeth and John Breyer, Jr.
Dale Brodsky
Matt Brody
Ann and Ken Brown
Mark Caro and Mary Dixon
Bob and Stacie Chukerman
Andrew Joseph (Andy) Cohen
Carol Bayersdorfer Cohen and Ed Cohen
Mitch Cohen and Stephanie Tomasky
Bonnie and Mike Cole
Jeff Colman and Ellen Nissenbaum
Louis Coppersmith
Jim and Suzy Cornbleet
Stuart Cowles
Carla and David Crane
Charles Dan
Jennifer Daskal
Gene Dattel and Licia Hahn
Jerry Dattel
Becky and Raven Deerwater
Bill and Leann Dexter
Jessie and Scott Diamond
Lou and Marilyn Diamond
David Dreifus and Jennifer Sosensky
Jed Dreifus
Jon Dreifus
Bill Dubinsky and Elizabeth Moss
Bob Dubinsky and Sarah Rubenstein
Ellen and Henry Dubinsky
Jim Feldman and Christine Taylor
Mary and Richard Fisher
Amy Foxman
Brad Foxman
Marjorie and Terry Franc
Cindy and Steve Frank
Bill and Laura Freeman
Bud and Julie Friedman
Jodi and Matt Friedman
Greg and Osnat Gafni-Pappas
Betsy and Spencer Garland
Alan Geismer, Jr.
Aliza and Jim Gerstein
Ricky Gitt
Bob and Susan Glasspiegel
Karla Bright and Ryan Glasspiegel
Lindsay and Michael Goldberg
Bill and Susan Goldenberg
Elaine and Mike Goldman
Jonathan Goldstein
Jim and Martha Gray
Josh Gray
Roger Greenbaum
Doug Greene Family Foundation
Scott and Sheliah Gruber
Debbie and Paul Guggenheim
Alan and Julie Halpern
Ted Harris
John Hart and Carol Prins
Paula Hassinger
Sara Feinstein and Larry Held
Oliver Held
Barnett and Shirley Helzberg, Jr. Foundation
Jaime Hensel
Alice and Joe Herz
Bob and Karen Herz
Bud and Hazel Herzog
Anna Hess
Hirsch-Schwartz Foundation
Ellyn and Matt Hoffman
Cathy Ann Kaufman Iger and Mark Iger
Dina and Steve Isaacs
Dan Jackson
Carol and Joel Jankowsky
Craig and Shari Jankowsky
Anne and Fred Joseph III
Ed Juda
Caryn and Harlan Kahn
John Kander
Ken Kanter
Stephanie Hanson and Adam Kaplan
Nathalie Feldman and Andy Kaplan
Cheryl Bondy Kaplan and Mark Kaplan
Jennifer Gilbert-Kaufmann and Robert Kaufmann
Euan and Jane Kerr
Malcolm Kerr
Sarah Kerr
Wendy Bloom and Arthur Kessler
Barbara and Dennis Kessler
Carol Kiersky
Stephen and Yael Klein Family Foundation
Jeff Kohn
Bud Kolbrener II
Rick and Stephanie Koretz
Andrea and Brian Kramer
Danielle Brinker and John Kramer
Janet C. Koestring and John Kupper
Emily and Michael Laskin
Marc Lawrence (Modestus Bauer Foundation)
Nancy Laytin
Bob and Cissy Lenobel
Jeff Levinson
Lia Grigg and Dan Levis
Hoagie Lippman
Courtney and Eddie Loeb
Steve Loeb
Richard Lowenthal
Donn and Michele Lux
Ted Silberstein and Jackie Mack
Ken and Laura Mack
Reed Maidenberg
Jorie and Robby Malk
Andrew and Jill Marcus
Nancy Marcus
Nancy Brown, M.D. and Andrew May
Jack and Lynn May Foundation
Matt and Norah Meadows
Medtronics (Matching Gift)
Jeff and Mary Kate Mellow
Bob and Susan Mendelsohn
Julia Gittleman, Ph.D. and Tom Mendelsohn
David and Deborah Mendelson
Misa Galazzi and David Michel
Jean Middleton
Malcolm and Paula Milsten
John and Sally Mitani
Erika and John Montag
Jamie and Leah Myers
Kristin Ahlberg and Phil Myers
Bill Nefsky
Bob and Mary Nefsky
Network for Good
Rick Cohn and Ben Neuman
Buzz Neusteter and Judi Perrill
Brule & Thad Kurowski and Katy Neusteter
Lee Anne Hartley and Tom Nevers
Geraldine and Jay Newmark
Robert Oppenheimer
PepsiCo (Matching Gifts)
Laurie and Todd Platt
Jerry and Jill Polacheck
Jennifer Pritzker, IL ARNG (Ret)
David and Kim Reich
Frank and Joan Revson
Hana Ruzicka Rivkin and Steven Rivkin
Don Robertson
Janet and Lee Rodgers
Cindy and Jon Rogen
Anthony and Marya Rose
Jim and Sherri Rosen
Carol Rosenblatt
Ellie and Trent Rosenbloom
Keri Rosenbloom and Jonathan Tobak
John and Nancy Ross
Lauren Katz and Joel Rubenstein
Gail G. Ifshin and Steven Salky
Mike Samuels
Laury and Lewis Scharff
Lee and Martha Schimberg
Bennett and Shelley Schmidt
Wendy Schoppert
Lynn and Max Schrayer
Carol and Jeff Schulman
Andrew Schwarz
Ed and Laura Schwarz
Monique and Robert Schweich
Glenda and Jim Seldin
Colleen Carroll and Mitch Semel
Joe and Sara Shacter
Jodi and Tom Shapira
Susie Ansehl and Rand Shapiro
Allan and Judy Sher
Bob and Natalie Silverman
Linda and Ron Sklar
Grace Slosburg
Krista Nelson and Tucker Slosburg
Michael Sobel
Geula and Josh Solomon
Nancy Chasen and Don Spero
Frank Star
Elena Stein
Nardie and Sally Stein
Perrin and Ted Stein
Elise and Richard Steinbaum
Corky and Rick Steiner Family Foundation
Ann and Will Stern
Alexandra Ackerman and David Stern
David Stern and Mary Elizabeth Calhoon Stern
Emily Glasser and Bill Susman
Brian and Carolyn Swett
TAWANI Foundation
Alan and Jo Anne Travis
Madge Treeger
Viasat, Inc. (Matching Gift)
Judy and Roger Wallenstein
Esther Starrels and John Wasserman
David and Michelle Weber
Michael Weinberg (II)
Cathy and Craig Weiss
Hank Wineman
Henry (Hank) and Trudi Wineman
Adam and Deborah Winick
Michael Woldenberg
Lee Wurtzburger
Emily and Jason Yale
David Zalk
Cory Zigler
Judy and Lon Zimmerman
John Zuraw

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Recent Donors to Camperships for Nebagamon

Camperships for Nebagamon (CFN) was established in 1995 to enable children who would not otherwise have the opportunity to have a camping experience. Over the years, the CFN endowment fund has provided camperships for boys to attend Nebagamon and girls to attend Camp WeHaKee. Campers receiving camperships help to diversify their camp communities by virtue of their racial, ethnic, religious and socioeconomic status. In addition, CFN continues the tradition of support to sons and grandsons of Nebagamon alumni who demonstrate financial need.

Over the past decade, more than 500 Camperships have been given out to more than 250 boys and girls attending Nebagamon and WeHaKee. Over $2 million has gone to support the cost of tuition and related expenses for these boys and girls.

The following individuals, foundation, and corporations supported CFN from November 1, 2020, through April 30, 2021:

Keith Abeles and Amy Levin
Steve Addison
Richard Allman
Amazon Smile Foundation
Anonymous
Pam and Tom Arenberg
Jeanne and Michael Aronoff
Art and Marian Auer
Deb and Joe Badt
Andrew and Elizabeth Baer
Camilla and Frank Baer
Nancy and Richard Baer
David and Karen Balser Family
Bob and Linda Barrows
Charlie Barrows
Jim and June Baumoel
Allen Bennett
Bert and Joan Berkley
Rita Bernstein
Simon and Susan Blattner
Bob Bloom and Alison Kamine
Susan and Tony Blumberg
Jim Blumenfeld and Chris Cooney
Adam and Julie Braude
Elizabeth and John Breyer Jr.
Hugh Broder
Dale Brodsky
Ann and Ken Brown
Spencer Brown
Jean and Mark Burnstine
Mark Caro and Mary Dixon
Marcia and Mark Cherniack
Bob and Stacie Chukerman
Andrew Joseph (Andy) Cohen
Andy Cohen
Carol Bayersdorfer Cohen and Ed Cohen
Ellie Cohen
Mitch Cohen and Stephanie Tomasky
Ralph Cohen
Patricia and Richard Cohn Family
Bonnie and Mike Cole
Kevin Cole
Michael Coletta
Jeff Colman and Ellen Nissenbaum
Louis Coppersmith
Hank Crane
Jennifer Daskal
Jane Davis
Becky and Raven Deerwater
Bill and Leann Dexter
Jessie and Scott Diamond
David Dreifus and Jennifer Sosensky
Luise Drolson
Bill Dubinsky and Elizabeth Moss
Bob Dubinsky and Sarah Rubenstein
Adam Eberhard
Judy-Ann Ehrlich
Deborah and Joe Eppstein
Peter Fechheimer and Jeannette F. McNeil
Kelli Cohen Fein, M.D. and Marty Fein
Jim Feldman and Christine Taylor
Brad Foxman
Adam Frapart
Bill and Laura Freeman
Barbara and Richard Fried
Bill Friedman and Marissa Jones
Bud and Julie Friedman
Jodi and Matt Friedman
Lisa and Steve Friedman
Greg and Osnat Gafni-Pappas
Judy Garfinkel
Betsy and Spencer Garland
Gartner (Matching Gift)
Alan Geismer, Jr.
Samuel Gellman
Scott Genshaft
Laurie Bruder and Tom Gerson
Glenn and Phyllis Gerstell
David and Ellen Gibbs
Ricky Gitt
Bill and Sandy Glassman
Bob and Susan Glasspiegel
Karla Bright and Ryan Glasspiegel
Bill and Susan Goldenberg
Chad and Debbie Goldenberg
Thomas Goldman
Malcolm and Mildred B. Goldsmith
Jonathan Goldstein
GOOGLE, Inc. (Matching Gifts)
Jerrold and Martha Graber
Marty Gradman
Janice Anderson and Tom Gram
Jesse Gray
Jim and Martha Gray
Josh Gray
Doug Greene Family
Debbie and Paul Guggenheim
Marc Gurstel
Jon and Judith Harris
Paula Hassinger
Mike Heldman
Jaime Hensel
Amie and Fred Herbert
Alice and Joe Herz
Barbara Herz
Bob and Karen Herz
Amy and Brian Herzog
Bud and Hazel Herzog
Charles and Cynthia Hirschhorn
Jason Hirschhorn
Jennifer Hodges
Anne Ledell-Hong and Nathaniel Hong
Nancy Mendelsohn, M.D. and Jay Horvath
Jim and Marybeth Hucker
Cathy Ann Kaufman Iger and Mark Iger
Derek Iger
Helaine and Warner Isaacs
Amy and Craig Jacobs
Craig and Shari Jankowsky
Joe Jankowsky
Kathy and Mike Jay
Anne and Fred Joseph, III
Ed Juda
Bob and Fiona Kahn
Caryn and Harlan Kahn
Diane and John Kalishman
Ben and Melinda Kanter
Daniel, Noah & Suzanne Kanter
Ken Kanter
Stephanie Hanson and Adam Kaplan
Cheryl Bondy Kaplan and Mark Kaplan
Alex Katz
Benjamin Katz
Jennifer Gilbert-Kaufmann and Robert Kaufmann
Leo Kayser III
Euan and Jane Kerr
Heide and Jim Klein
Tom Kolbrener
Bud Kolbrener II
Rick and Stephanie Koretz
Claudia Simons and Alan Korn
Andrea and Brian Kramer
Danielle Brinker and John Kramer
Marc Lawrence (Modestus Bauer Foundation)
Dan Laytin
Nancy Laytin
Eli Lehrer
Bob and Cissy Lenobel
Jeff Levinson
Lia Grigg and Dan Levis
Joshua Levy
Drew Lieberman and Randi Shafton
Hoagie Lippman
Henry Docter and Elizabeth Loeb
Tom Loeb
Ken and Laura Mack
Jorie and Robby Malk
The Reggi Marder Foundation
Dru Margolin
Julie and Steve Mathes
Robert Matz and Peggy Warner
Trace McCreary
Matt and Norah Meadows
Jeff and Mary Kate Mellow
Joe Mendels
Bill Mendelsohn and Peggy Tracy
Don and Marji Mendelsohn
Jim Mendelsohn
Lauren Martini and Matthew Mendelsohn
Julia Gittleman, Ph.D. and Tom Mendelsohn
Audrey and Danny Meyer
Nancy Meyer and Marc Weiss
Misa Galazzi and David Michel
Dick and Nancy Milsten
Leslie and Stuart Milsten
Malcolm and Paula Milsten
Ann and Gary Mollengarden
Zach Mollengarden
Mike and Teena Myers
Jeffrey Nefouse
Bill Nefsky
Bob and Mary Nefsky
Jeff Neuman and Cynthia Wachtell
Buzz Neusteter and Judi Perrill
Brule & Thad Kurowski and Katy Neusteter
Andy and Peggy Newman
Geraldine and Jay Newmark
Chi Nguyen
Gail and Sean O’Connor
Robert Oppenheimer
PepsiCo Foundation (Matching Gifts)
Betty and Tom Philipsborn
Laurie and Todd Platt
Kevin and Rita Powers
Jennifer Pritzker, IL ARNG (Ret)
Marcia Kaplan, M.D. and Michael Privitera, M.D.
Laurin and Mindy Quiat
Cindy and Jon Rogen
Alyne and Jim Rolfe
Andy and Cynthia Rolfe
Anthony and Marya Rose
Jim and Sherri Rosen
Carol Rosenblatt
Kathy and Skip Rosenblatt
Ellie and Trent Rosenbloom
Keri Rosenbloom and Jonathan Tobak
Joseph Rosenbloom III
Carol and Roger Rosenthal
Lauren Katz and Joel Rubenstein
Trish Russell
Chris and Frank Sachs
David Sachs
Stephen Sachs
Gail G. Ifshin and Steven Salky
Erin and Seth Salomon
Dan and Dawn Saltzstein
Mike Samuels
Ruth Sang
John Sawyer
James and Tiffany Scharff
Jon and Sue Scharff
Laury and Lewis Scharff
Sue Ann Schiff
Marily and Spike Schonthal, Jr
Fred and Pat Schonwald, Jr.
Wendy Schoppert
Lynn and Max Schrayer
Carol and Jeff Schulman
Andrew and Debbie Schwartz
Monique and Robert Schweich
Lee and Mark Scissors
Joanne Grossman and John Seesel
Judith and Mark Segal
Colleen Carroll and Mitch Semel
Joe and Sara Shacter
Susie Ansehl and Rand Shapiro
Allan and Judy Sher
Joseph Shlaferman and Judy Zins
Ashley and Mike Sholiton
Bob and Natalie Silverman
Irwin and Patti Silverman
Kevin Silverman
Stephanie Rivkin and Joel Sircus
Linda and Ron Sklar
Grace Slosburg
Krista Nelson and Tucker Slosburg
Bob and Sue Smith
Julie and Rick Smith
Geula and Josh Solomon
Nancy Chasen and Don Spero
Elena Stein
Perrin and Ted Stein
Sally and Nardie Stein
Elise and Richard Steinbaum
John Stephenson and Karin Susens
Ann and Will Stern
David Stern and Mary Elizabeth Calhoon Stern
Barney and Nancy Straus, Jr.
Debra Levis and Emanuel Tabachnik
TAWANI Foundation
The Pittsburgh Foundation
Leslie Milsten Thornton
Jim and Merryl Tisch
Michael and Pegi Touff
Madge Treeger
Jeff Trenton
Beth and Phil Trout
Loris and Robert Ungar
UHG – United Health Group (Matching Gifts)
Viasat, Inc. (Matching Gift)
Judy and Roger Wallenstein
Esther Starrels and John Wasserman
David and Michelle Weber
Tom Weinberg
Michael Weinberg II
Cathy and Craig Weiss
Nancy Werthan
Jordan White
Hank Wineman
Adam and Deborah Winick
Stephen Woldenberg
Joanne and Trip Wolf
Lee Wurtzburger
Emily and Jason Yale
Carol and Michael Yunker
Cory Zigler
Judy and Lon Zimmerman